IMMIGRATION psychological EVALUATION

Immgration Evaluation

An Immigration Evaluation with professional psychosocial and demographic expertise

Immigration status is as important as someone’s race and sense of identity. It intersects with the way a person navigates the world around them. For individuals unauthorized to live in the United States, it often appears as a psychological stressor as they constantly live in fear of deportation and family separation. Similarly, asylees often fear persecution, violence and discrimination in the countries they are emigrating from. Our evaluations draw upon research and theories that corroborate the narrative given, offering the client precise insights into the effects of psychological stressors and economic hardships linked to their immigration status on daily life. These assessments are crafted to align with legal standards, simultaneously acknowledging the significant psychosocial challenges the client and their families endure.

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Who conducts the Evaluation?

The evaluation is conducted by Ahmed Alif, a licensed clinical social worker in the State of New York. His research and practice focus on how policies and program related to immigration enforcement impact health and mental health of unauthorized immigrants and their families. He has several years of experience working with marginalized communities in New York, more specially with DACA recipients, mixed-status families where one member of the family is undocumented or unauthorized to remain in the United States, refugees and asylum seekers.Ahmed holds a B.S. degree in Applied Psychology from New York University and a M.S. degree in Social Work with a focus on health, mental health and disabilities from Columbia University. 

 

What is an Immigration Evaluation?

An immigration evaluation explores and defines the trauma that an individual experienced throughout their life. More specifically, it explores how hardship and stressors related to immigration impacts their mental health.

 

What does the Evaluation provide?

The evaluation includes a comprehensive psychosocial assessment that explore migration, family structure and mental health presenting problems as identified by the client. In addition, it is accompanied by supplemental documents to support the evaluation such as the Department of State reports and academic research. 

 

What is unique about our Evaluation?

Immigration status is as important as someone’s race and sense of identity. It intersects with the way a person navigates the world around them. For individuals unauthorized to live in the United States, it often appears as a psychological stressor as they constantly live in fear of deportation and family separation. Similarly, asylees often fear persecution, violence and discrimination in the countries they are emigrating from. Our evaluations stand out because they are deeply informed by an understanding of language, culture, empathy, and research. We recognize the profound impact of immigration status on an individual’s life, akin to their race and identity, affecting their interaction with the world. This perspective allows us to provide nuanced insights into the psychological stress and economic hardships experienced by those unauthorized to live in the U.S., as well as the fears of persecution faced by asylees. While our approach is empathetic and culturally sensitive, it’s important to note that we do not support or accept false claims, ensuring the maintenance of high standards and integrity in our work.

What does the Evaluation consist of?

It consists of a psychosocial assessment that review medical and mental health history, followed by family history, mental status exam and other pertinent information. A diagnosis based on DSM-V criteria is also provided for the assessment. Form I-610 is also reviewed in coordination with legal counsel.

 

What are the different types of Evaluation?

Our specialized immigration evaluation services cater to a diverse array of legal needs, including hardship waivers, cancellation of removal petitions, asylum petitions, and applications under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), as well as U and T visas. Hardship waiver evaluations focus on the significant difficulties a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident would encounter if their family member were not allowed into or were removed from the U.S. Cancellation of removal evaluations are designed for non-permanent residents, assessing the negative impact their removal would have on lawful residents or citizen family members. Asylum evaluations are aimed at individuals fleeing persecution or the fear of persecution based on race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion. Lastly, evaluations for VAWA, and U and T visas, support victims of domestic violence, trafficking, or other serious crimes, documenting the abuse or harm suffered and its mental and emotional health implications. Each evaluation type is distinct, specifically tailored to meet the unique requirements set forth by immigration laws to assist applicants in navigating their path to relief or legal status in the United States effectively.

Can you briefly describe the different types of evaluation?

U-visa: This evaluation focuses on the psychological effects of being a victim of a crime (such as domestic violence, sexual assault, or human trafficking) in the U.S. It documents the emotional and psychological trauma experienced by the victim, which supports their U-visa application.

Cancellation of Removal: The evaluation aims to demonstrate the significant emotional and psychological hardship that a non-citizen’s deportation would cause to themselves or their U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident family members. It emphasizes the familial ties and potential psychological consequences of separation.

601 Hardship Waiver: This evaluation is crucial in showing the extreme hardship a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident would endure if their relative is not granted a waiver for inadmissibility to the U.S. It outlines the psychological impact and difficulties the U.S. relative would face without the waiver.

VAWA: In the context of VAWA, the psychological evaluation documents the abuse (physical, emotional, or psychological) suffered by the immigrant at the hands of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident spouse or parent. It underscores the mental health consequences of the abuse and supports the self-petition for lawful status under VAWA.

Asylum: For asylum seekers, the evaluation illustrates the psychological effects of persecution (or fear thereof) on the basis of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion in their home country. It provides evidence of trauma and ongoing mental health challenges, which support the claim for protection and asylum in the U.S.

How does the process look?

The evaluation process consists of a one-hour initial interview and a one-hour follow-up session, designed to provide a comprehensive assessment. During these sessions, the clinician and client engage in a one-on-one conversation to build rapport and a therapeutic alliance. This approach facilitates an in-depth exploration of psychological and social factors, incorporating biopsychosocial evaluations, trauma interviews, and the use of psychometric tools and questionnaires. Together, these elements contribute to a holistic understanding of the client’s needs and circumstances.

How long does it take?

The evaluation process begins with an initial interview and is followed by detailed biopsychosocial and trauma assessments, along with psychometric evaluations. After the interview, at least one hour is dedicated to post-interview research to support the client’s narrative. From start to finish, including the compilation of a comprehensive report, the entire process is completed within a two-week timeframe, ensuring an efficient yet thorough assessment.

What is the cost?

We offer a sliding scale payment system, ensuring affordability by adjusting fees based on your annual income: under $55k pays $1200, $56k-$74k pays $1300, $75k-$89k pays $1400, and $90k or more pays $1500, to maintain transparency and fairness in our services.

The sliding scale works by adjusting the cost of services according to the client’s ability to pay, based on their annual income. This approach ensures that services remain accessible to those with lower incomes, while those with higher incomes contribute more, reflecting their greater financial capacity.

Can I pay in installments?

The initial payment, which is half of the total fee, is due at the time of your interview. For example, if your annual income is under $55k, your total fee would be $1200, so the initial payment due at the interview would be $600. The remaining balance is payable upon submission of the evaluation to your lawyer, following a review period typically spanning 1-2 weeks. Should you face significant financial difficulties, we offer the flexibility to extend the final payment over a period of 3-6 months, depending on your specific circumstances.

What languages do you speak?

English, Bengali, Spanish, French/Creole, Mandarin and Hindi-Urdu.

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